"Big play" in Rose Bowl a dream for Pendleton

"Big play" in Rose Bowl a dream for Pendleton

Scoring a touchdown in Pasadena fulfills a lifelong goal for Michigan State's fullback.

Winning the Rose Bowl was a dream realized for the Spartans, but it carried a little bit more for Michigan State fullback Trevon Pendleton.

Growing up in Lucasville, Ohio, Pendleton and his brother, Jerrod, constantly talked about scoring a touchdown in the Rose Bowl.

So when he caught a 2-yard touchdown pass from Connor Cook in the second quarter in Pasadena, it was a big deal.

"I remember playing that over in my head when I was a little kid, but it's a dream come true honestly," he said. "Ever since I was like 5 years old, my brother and I, that's all we talked about was playing in Rose Bowl and making a big play in the Rose Bowl.

"I remember sitting at home and watching when Vince Young scored and saying I wanna do something like that one day."

The play was big, as it pulled the Spartans within 17-14 going into halftime with the ball coming their way to open the second half.

It also took improvisation from Cook and Pendleton to happen.

"It was a run-action play and we though we would get them to bite up and they didn't bite up near as much as we thought," he said. "I saw that Connor was coming up, so I tried to work myself up to an open spot and I finally lost the defender for a second and Connor made a heck of a play to get me the ball."

It wasn't Pendleton's only big play of the day, as he keyed the Spartans' first touchdown drive with a 19-yard reception on third down to extend the drive.

He also had the key block to spring Jeremy Langford for a 2-yard touchdown.

The 24-20 win against Stanford was not a surprise to Pendleton who said it was just capping off what the team knew it could do.

"We knew all along we had a very talented team and we were well-coached and worked hard. We just missed by a few inches last year here and there, but we knew this was very possible and very realistic."

But seeing the dream come true that he had since he was a kid growing up in Ohio gave it an extra special feeling.

"It's the best feeling in the world," he said. "Words really can't describe it and can't do it justice. To be with these group of guys and know all that we went through to get here and to see all the smiles on their faces, that's something special."

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